Mpesa takes on Banks with Mpesa Prepaid Card

 

lipa na mpesa cardToday, Mpesa announced it was piloting an Mpesa Payments Card, a  Lipa na Mpesa prepaid card. Mpesa card was inevitable, given the Kenyan local cards versus mobile payments turf wars pitting Kenyan Banks on one end vs Safaricom.

Techweez reported,

“The card, mirrors a user’s M-Pesa account, meaning whatever amounts are in your M-Pesa wallet are reflected in the card.”

 

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The evolution of Kenya’s informal sector agency

Mobile money human agent were one of the key pillars of Mpesa and mobile money success.

Today, human agents in Kenya, and Nairobi have evolved to cater for an increasing number of services: cash in cash out, banking service, prepaid utility.

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Overbanked in Nairobi

Here in Nairobi, I am have wide choice  of financial services and payments options. At any one moment in time, I have:

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My takeaways from E-payments panel at Connected 2016

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I was delighted to sit on an electronic payments and the future of cash panel at the connected 2016 conference. As co-founder and Chief Analyst at Umati Blockchain ltd., my invitation scope was Bitcoin, virtual currencies and the blockchain. It was great getting feedback from the audience, on what is wrong with Kenya’s cashless transition. A healthy nuance of talking points emerged from the mixed backgrounds of the panelists.

Here is a 30 min edited video of the panel session

These were my takeaways

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Why we should Slay Mpesa, and save the town

article2Kenya and east africa’s mobile money systems are overly reliant on Telco’s networks and SIM modules. The status quo is detrimental to Banks, Non-banking financial institutions and a whole host of digital token value services e.g sports betting and prepaid electricity tokens.

Telcos, now Mobile Money Operators, are a Banks wet dream. Peer to peer money transfers in Kenya almost always route through a mobile network operator’s SMS, SIM card and USSD channels; they are the gatekeepers.
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How much it costs to send money btwn Kenya & Tanzania via Mpesa

A couple of weeks ago Safaricom and Vodacom announced a cross border money transfer service on the Tanzania – Kenya corridor. Both subsidiaries of UK-based Vodafone Group, are leaders in their respective home markets. Through this partnership, registered Mpesa and Vodacom users can send and receive money in either direction.

With assistance from my friend (Ofio) in Tanzania’s capital, Dar, I set to out to test this service and found out:

It costs 6.24% in total to send 4,000 TZs to Kenya. A 4.74% forex margin spread is applied plus 1.5% sending charges . The same applies for TZ to Kenya bound transactions from Vodacom to Mpesa.

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5 more things they didn’t tell you about m pesa

Cover Mpesa myths

Despite a fair number of attempts at elaborately fleshing out Mpesa for readers, in this article I outline 5 more things left out  by:

Claudia McKay & Rafe Mazer did an article for the CGAP titles “10 Myths About Mpesa: 2014 Update” – a follow up to a previous article by Claire Alexandre “10 things you thought you knew about Mpesa”. In both of these articles, 5 crucial things were left out that you should know about!

Mpesa is used on a contractual basis from Vodafone Group.

M-pesa is not a Kenyan invention, by any stretch. M-pesa is owned by Vodafone Group, was partly funded by the UK DFID, conceptualized by Nick Hughes – an executive at Vodafone – in 2003 and finally project managed by Susan Lonie – an m-commerce expert – from pilot to commercial operation.

A confluence of factors – fashionable sustainable development, microcredit prospects in East Africa and a willing mobile network operator, Safaricom – meant that Kenya was a hotbed for testing a pilot. [Read more…]

10 differences between Mpesa and Bitcoin

Bitcoin vs Mpesa featured image

Centralized – Decentralized

Mpesa is a centralized electronic money system owned by Vodafone. All transactions are settled on a centralized ledger on a central server.

Bitcoin is a decentralized electronic value transfer network owned by no one. All transactions occur on decentralized ledger on a distributed network.

Pegged to local fiat on 1:1 ratio – Free floating market price

KES 200 cash for MPesa KES 200 on a feature phone

Digital currency Mpesa is issued money, fully (100%) backed by liquid reserves on a 1:1 ratio. For every Mpesa unit in mobile wallets, there is matching fiat held in trust. The value is fixed.

Bitcoin is NOT backed by anything and derives its price from a free floating market exchange. Its value changes with market sentiments.

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Why isn’t Africa adopting Bitcoins massively for money-transfers?

Bitcoin adoption in Africa, not what you expect

Answer by Michael Kimani:

There’s a lot of variables in play before bitcoin can be used for money transfer on a significant scale. I’ll outline a few.

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The Role of Regulators in Mobile Money Deployment

PREAMBLEmobile runner

Mobile Money (MM) is hailed for accelerating financial inclusion and its potential for reining in an even greater multitude of unbanked global citizens into the formal financial systems. To harness its potency, policy and regulatory environments hold the key to exhausting its potential. It falls within the domain of Telecommunications and Financial Regulators/ Central banks. Central banks have asserted their regulatory authority in more recent times as Mobile Money (MM) has emerged as a remedy for financial exclusion risk. Central Banks in developing countries, including Sub Saharan Africa, are keen on leveraging MM to further their cause.

First, it’s important to state that Central Banks in emerging economies have a vast and vested interest in the success of mobile payment services. Indeed, as mentioned above, mobile payment services can contribute directly to the economic growth of the country – GFG group

Regulating MM presents simultaneous challenges and profound benefits. Regulatory and policy objectives have to be balanced with sensitive competitive market dynamics. Restrictive regulation can stifle competition, innovation and market adoption.

The importance of policy and regulatory frameworks in mobile banking development has inspired empirical research reports on the subject  such as What Regulatory Frameworks Are More Conducive to Mobile Banking? – World Bank. A 2013 GSMA report, titled Mobile Money: Enabling regulatory solutions, broadly categorized aspects encompassing all pertinent areas of MM regulation. [Read more…]